November 16, 2020 PHO Order: Midwives authorized to perform COVID-19 swabs within approved screening programs

The Provincial Health Officer has temporarily authorized midwives to perform nasopharyngeal swabs to screen for SARS-CoV-2, for any person, within approved COVID-19 screening programs (e.g. COVID-19 test collection sites). As per the order, midwives will need their competence to perform nasopharyngeal swabs assessed by their employer or the Medical Health Officer. This change is effective immediately and will remain in effect for the duration of the COVID-19 public health emergency in British Columbia.

Midwives who are not part of such a screening program continue to be authorized to perform nasopharyngeal swabs only for individuals/clients who are pregnant or postpartum: no competency assessment is required. Please contact the BCCDC to order the swabs and for specific guidance on swabbing technique and PPE requirements.

In all cases, midwives must perform this screening activity in accordance with the guidelines issued by the BC Centre for Disease Control.

Questions?

 

Clarity about the Provincial Health Officer’s Orders Issued on November 7, 2020

B.C.’s Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry on Nov. 7, 2020 issued new Covid-related orders specific to the Fraser Health and Vancouver Coastal Health regions. Specifically, Dr. Henry ordered that there are to be:

No social gatherings of any size with anyone other than your immediate household. For example:

  • Do not invite friends or extended family to your household
  • Do not gather outdoors
  • Do not gather at restaurants

Delivery of care in homes

The delivery of care in the homes of patients and clients, or in community-based clinics, does not constitute a “social gathering”. Registrants who provide care to patients and clients in these settings are expected to continue as they did prior to the issuance of this new order.

Midwives, nurses and nurse practitioners are reminded they should also continue to follow WorkSafeBC and the College’s standards/guidance for the appropriate use of PPE when delivering care.

Resources for midwives

BCCDC – Recommendations for antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum care for clients during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Standards for post-partum care

Questions?

Email practice@bccnm.ca 

Midwifery News | October 2020 – now available

 

October 2020

Registration fees for 2021-22

For 2021-22, practising midwife registration will cost $740.95 (a 70% reduction). The reduction of the midwife fee aligns the profession’s registration fees with those of nurse practitioners because our initial analysis suggests that the costs of regulating the two professions is similar.

Non-practising midwife registration will decrease to $94.90 (a 68% reduction) to align with non-practising registration for nursing professionals.

Student midwife registration will cost $208.05, an increase of 39%. This aligns the cost of student midwife registration with employed student nurses, and more accurately reflects the costs of regulating this group.

These adjusted registration fees take into account the funds required to invest in new business processes and improved IT systems as a result of the amalgamation of the former nursing and midwifery regulators.

Read more

Nursing education program update

The BCCNM board withdrew recognition of Canadian Health Care Academy practical nursing education programs effective Oct. 16, 2020.

Read more


 

For more information:

bccnm.ca

British Columbia College of Nurses and Midwives
900 – 200 Granville St.
Vancouver, B.C.

You are receiving this email because you are either a registrant of BCCNM or you signed up to receive emails from us. BCCNM is legally required to deliver notices about nursing practice, midwifery practice and professional regulation to its registrants. If you are a retired nurse or retired midwife or if you are not a registrant and no longer wish to receive emails from us, please unsubscribe below.

 

2021-22 BCCNM registration fees

The following is a summary of the 2021-22 BCCNM midwifery registration fees. To view all BCCNM fees, see the BCCNM fee schedule.

Practising midwife fees
Practising midwife registration will cost $740.95, a 70% reduction.

As a not-for-profit organization, BCCNM aims to set fees on cost-recovery basis. The reduction of the practising midwife fee aligns the profession’s registration fees with those for practising nurse practitioners, because our initial analysis suggests that the costs of regulating the two professions is similar. The decrease is also due in part to increasing the fees for initial applications and other charges, as outlined below.

Non-practising fees
Non-practising midwife registration will decrease to $94.90 (a 68% reduction) to align with non-practising registration for nursing professionals.

Student midwife fees
Student midwife registration will cost $208.05, an increase of 39%. This aligns the cost of student midwife registration with employed student nurses, and more accurately reflects the costs of regulating this group.

These adjusted registration fees take into account the funds required to invest in new business processes and improved IT systems as a result of the amalgamation of the former nursing and midwifery regulators.

Application fees
Application fees are also being adjusted to create alignment in fees for nurses and midwives, and to reflect the cost of the work required to assess applications. Most significantly, this includes:

  • Reinstating to practising: Applications for reinstatement to practising registration for all nursing classes and midwives will be increased to $230.00+GST to align with the application fee for initial registration for B.C. graduates. This represents a $200.00+GST increase for midwives. Note: The implementation of this fee will be delayed until April 1, 2021 to enable registrants currently on leave to return to practice.
  • Application for student midwifery: Applications for student midwives will increase from $75.00 to $150.00 to align with employed student nurse and employed student psychiatric nurse application fees.
  • Moving from practising to non-practising: Applying for a change in registration class from practising to non-practising midwife will increase from $30 to $100 to align with fees for nursing professionals.

Credit card fee
BCCNM pays credit card fees on every transaction where a credit card is used for payment. This amounts to approximately $750,000 a year in credit card fees. Starting in January 2021, payments made by Mastercard or Visa will have a 2.5% convenience fee added directly by the credit card processor. Interac Online and pre-authorized payment are available as additional payment options.

Questions
If you have questions about 2021-22 registration fees, please contact us at registermidwives@bccnm.ca or 604.742.6200.

Midwifery News | September 2020 – now available

BCCNM | September 2020

PHO notice: Primary care providers to report suspected incidences of MIS-C

The Provincial Health Officer has received reports of children and adolescents in British Columbia presenting with a syndrome that could have been COVID-19 associated Multi-system Inflammatory Syndrome (MIS-C). While no case has been linked to COVID-19, it is important for midwives to report each suspected incidence of MIS-C and information about each incidence to the medical health officer in their regional health authority.

Read more

New virtual supports for rural healthcare providers

A new initiative is now available to support rural healthcare providers. Real-Time Virtual Support (RTVS) pathways provide physicians, midwives, nurse practitioners, and nurses in rural, remote, and First Nations communities with access to 24-hour, just-in-time advice to support patient care.

Read more

Midwives encouraged to complete cultural safety training

The San’yas: Indigenous Cultural Safety Training is a unique, on-line program designed to enhance self-awareness, and strengthen the skills of those who work both directly and indirectly with Indigenous people. This program is particularly relevant in light of the ongoing investigation into allegations of racism in our province’s ERs.

Read more

New prescribing standard for RNs & RPNs

The BCCNM board approved new standards, limits, and conditions for prescribing medications and limits and conditions for prescribing buprenorphine/naloxone to treat opioid use disorder. These new standards, limits, and conditions come into effect on Oct. 26, 2020 and apply to both RNs and RPNs.

Read more

Upcoming hearings

For more information:

bccnm.ca

British Columbia College of Nurses and Midwives
900 – 200 Granville St.
Vancouver, B.C.

You are receiving this email because you are either a registrant of BCCNM or you signed up to receive emails from us. BCCNM is legally required to deliver notices about nursing practice, midwifery practice and professional regulation to its registrants. If you are a retired nurse or retired midwife or if you are not a registrant and no longer wish to receive emails from us, please unsubscribe below.

 

B.C. midwives encouraged to complete San’yas Indigenous Cultural Safety Training

What’s the course about?

The San’yas: Indigenous Cultural Safety Training is a unique, on-line training program designed to enhance self-awareness, and strengthen the skills of those who work both directly and indirectly with Indigenous people. The goal of the training is to develop understanding and promote positive partnerships between service providers and Indigenous people.

Skilled facilitators guide and support each learner through interactive course materials. Participants examine culture, stereotyping, and the consequences and legacies of colonization. Through the program, they learn about terminology; diversity; as well as aspects of colonial history such as Indian residential schools and Indian Hospitals.

Continuous professional development

Midwives are lifelong learners who continually assess and improve their practice. The San’yas Indigenous Cultural Safety Training program is particularly relevant in light of the ongoing investigation into allegations of racism in our province’s ERs. We encourage midwives who haven’t yet done the course to consider adding it to their professional development.

BCCNM also supports its own staff to complete the training as part of their own professional development.

PHO notice: Primary care providers to report suspected incidences of MIS-C

The following message was sent to all primary care providers on behalf of Dr. Bonnie Henry, provincial health officer.

I have received reports of children and adolescents in British Columbia presenting with a syndrome that could have been COVID-19 associated Multi-system Inflammatory Syndrome (MIS-C). While no case has been linked to COVID-19, it is important that we track this closely to inform parents and clinicians about this syndrome in B.C.

Therefore, I am hereby providing notice of a duty to report each suspected incidence of MIS-C and information about each incidence to the medical health officer in your regional health authority.

Read the official notice here.

The following is a description of MIS-C and the information to be reported.

Incidences of people with Multi-system Inflammatory Syndrome in Children and Adolescents (MIS-C) are to be promptly reported to the medical health officer and include any cases with onset since January 1, 2020.

Patients to be reported are children and adolescents 0-19 years of age with fever ≥ 3 days AND two of the following:

  • Acute gastrointestinal symptoms (abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea)
  • Rash or bilateral non-purulent conjunctivitis or muco-cutaneous inflammation signs (oral, hands or feet)
  • Hypotension or shock
  • Features of myocardial dysfunction, or pericarditis, or valvulitis, or coronary abnormalities (ECHO findings or elevated Troponin/BNP/NT-proBNP)
  • Evidence of coagulopathy (abnormal PT, PTT, elevated d-dimer)
    • and Elevated markers of inflammation such as ESR, C-reactive protein, or procalcitonin
    • and No other obvious microbial cause of inflammation, including bacterial sepsis, staphylococcal or streptococcal shock syndromes, or no alternative plausible obvious diagnosis

Such people should be tested for evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection (positive PCR test or serology) for confirmation purposes.

The information to be reported about each incidence includes:

  1. First name
  2. Last name
  3. Personal Health Number
  4. Phone number
  5. Sex
  6. Date of Birth
  7. Age (in years)
  8. Date of symptoms onset
  9. Health care facility contact (i.e. name of hospital or clinic at which patient was assessed/admitted)
  10. Name and contact information of reporting health professional

Thank you for your continued support of measures to prevent and manage COVID-19 in B.C.

Bonnie Henry, MD, MPH, FRCPC

Provincial Health Officer

Office of the PHO

Ministry of Health

New virtual supports available for healthcare providers in rural, remote and First Nations communities

A new virtual support initiative is now available for rural healthcare providers to deliver timely patient-centred care closer to home. Real-Time Virtual Support (RTVS) pathways provide midwives, nurse practitioners, nurses and physicians in rural, remote, and First Nations communities with access to 24-hour, just-in-time advice to support patient care. The pathways were developed not only to improve access to care but also to help rural healthcare providers seek support about their patients or situations in a safe, non-judgmental way.

Through Zoom, practitioners can be connected to one of five teams providing culturally safe and compassionate support:

  1. RUDi – Emergency
  2. ROSe – Critical Care
  3. CHARLiE – Pediatrics
  4. MaBAL – Maternity and Newborn
  5. UBC Dermatology Rural and Remote Service

These teams have an understanding of the rural and cultural contexts and are available to support rural healthcare providers for any issue, including:

  • providing a patient consult, second opinion, or ongoing patient support;
  • reviewing a patient case;
  • running through patient simulation scenarios;
  • navigating the healthcare system; and
  • providing collaborative support in critical times.

There is also a toolkit available that’s aimed at helping healthcare providers in rural, remote, and First Nations communities navigate the pathways and includes access information, Zoom instructions, FAQs, bios and photos of RTVS teams, and posters.

Real-Time Virtual Support is an initiative of the Virtual Health and Wellness Collaborative for Rural and First Nations BC and is made possible through the incredible work and collaboration of the Rural Coordination Centre of BC (supported by the Joint Standing Committee on Rural Issues), First Nations Health Authority, Provincial Health Services Authority, Providence Health Care, BC Emergency Medicine Network, and UBC Department of Emergency Medicine.